US Politics vs. International campaign finance: How do countries compare?


Today, the U.S. Supreme Court went beyond “Citizen’s United” to strike down overall limits on how much an individual may contribute to elections. By contrast, Norway’s political parties are 74% government funded and corporate TV and radio campaign advertising is banned.

Political donors in the United States are breaking out their checkbooks to finance what is expected to be the most expensive presidential election in American history.

I hate watching TV during election season.  The political ads make it intolerable.

I hate watching TV during election season. The political ads make it intolerable.

The Center for Responsive Politics estimates $6 billion will be spent in the U.S. elections by campaigns, political parties and corporations hoping to propel their candidates into the White House and what writer Mark Twain once called the “best Congress money can buy.”

The projected price tag of the 2012 U.S. election dwarfs that of other nations, but corruption monitors from Transparency International (TI) say it’s not just how much will be spent but where the money is coming from that threatens the integrity of politics around the world.

Nigeria, Brazil, Russia, India, United Kingdom and Norway all are compared.

Continue reading at http://www.cnn.com/2012/01/24/world/global-campaign-finance/

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About The Mental Meddler

A quirky, opinionated gay guy who offends both liberal and conservatives.

Posted on April 3, 2014, in News & Politics, Political and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Comments Off on US Politics vs. International campaign finance: How do countries compare?.

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